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The Guttmacher Institute reports that one-third of pregnant teens receive insufficient prenatal care and that their children are more likely to have health issues in childhood or be hospitalized than those born to older women.

In the case for Latinas and teenage pregnancy there are barriers that prevent them from receiving any health care.

Poor academic performance in the children of teenage mothers has also been noted, with many of the children being held back a grade level, scoring lower on standardized tests, and/or failing to graduate from secondary school.

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Rates of teenage pregnancies are higher in societies where it is traditional for girls to marry young and where they are encouraged to bear children as soon as they are able.

For example, in some sub-Saharan African countries, early pregnancy is often seen as a blessing because it is proof of the young woman's fertility.

Risks of low birth weight, premature labor, anemia, and pre-eclampsia are connected to biological age, being observed in teen births even after controlling for other risk factors (such as accessing prenatal care etc.).

However, in these societies, early pregnancy may combine with malnutrition and poor health care to cause medical problems.

Pregnant teenagers face many of the same pregnancy related issues as other women.

There are additional concerns for those under the age of 15 as they are less likely to be physically developed to sustain a healthy pregnancy or to give birth.

The risk of maternal death for girls under age 15 in low and middle income countries is higher than for women in their twenties.

Several studies have examined the socioeconomic, medical, and psychological impact of pregnancy and parenthood in teens.

Teenage pregnancy puts young women at risk for health issues, economic, social and financial issues.

One study in 2001 found that women that gave birth during their teens completed secondary-level schooling 10–12% as often and pursued post-secondary education 14–29% as often as women who waited until age 30.

When used in combination, educational interventions and access to birth control can reduce unintended teenage pregnancies.

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